Why Street Artists Hide Their Identities?

Street artist Bansky is a true contemporary phenomenon. It is an incredibly famous artist about whom almost nothing is known. Just so that he hails from the city of Bristol and is one of the most famous but at the same time the most mysterious street artists in the world. There are many theories circulating on the Internet about what could be the real Banksy, but his secret remained undisclosed. As a result, Bansky inspired the new trend to hide the personalities for the young generation of street artists. There are many wonders why people want to stay incognito and in what ways street art creators preserve their privacy. We will examine this issue through a few specific examples.

Nickname as a New Identity

Many people who are drawing on the urban and public places have created new names – nicknames. Later, as artistic activities continue, some of them sign and add their real name. If drawing illegally, and for many street art painters, is just such a beginning, it cannot sign in their real name, a nickname is needed for breaking the law. Also, the nickname is usually shorter, more memorable, original, and sounds cool. And after it sticks, it stays that way for the rest of your life.

Street art requires a long-term relationship with urban spaces. The accurate observations of some artists stem from the urban context and reflect changes in the city. It would often be interesting to know what such artists think about the use of other media, such as projections, posters, or other legal expressions of their art.

Nickname as a New Identity
Nickname as a New Identity

Mask Like a Shield

In order to preserve anonymity, it is not only covered by a nickname, but also by a mask. Here it is very important for the Italian street artist Manu Invisible that his work speaks for him, so he decided to hide his face. He says the mask for him is a kind of shield that helps to separate private life from professional life, protecting privacy from prying eyes, attention, and public opinion.

Mask Like a Shield
Mask Like a Shield

In Sardinia, where he draws, masks have deep ancient traditions. Looking back at history, the mask has been used by many artists and musicians to preserve anonymity. The black mask that Manu Invisible wears while working is inspired by the night, because in the beginning I had to draw a lot in the dark, and the geometric shapes, because it is an integral part of his work.

The black mask that Manu Invisible wears while working is inspired by the night, as at the beginning I had to draw a lot in the dark, and the geometric shapes, as it is an integral part of his work. As the artist himself argues, the world is a huge pot of ideas from which we draw, and the difference is in how the artist expresses himself. The point is what you communicate, not physical appearance. We live in times when it is difficult to maintain our complete privacy. Most use social networks while they collect information about us. Perhaps that is why artists who hide their identities are fueling our curiosity today.